So it’s the dreaded third Monday of January and the day that is commonly known as Blue Monday. But what is Blue Monday and where did it come from?

Like 2020, 2021 will also be remembered for largely the wrong reasons, with the coronavirus pandemic continuing to make our lives that bit harder and the number of adults experiencing depression has almost doubled from before the outbreak. With the festive season well and truly over, another period of winter in sight and a long stretch between pay days, you’re not alone if you find yourself feeling down.

What is Blue Monday?

Taking place on the third Monday of January – which this year falls on January 17 – Blue Monday is supposedly the saddest day of the year, due to a combination of bad weather and the come down from the festive period. But did you know it was originally conceived as a PR stunt to up-sell travel? The idea of Blue Monday was first conceived by Dr. Cliff Arnall in 2005 and it was published as part of a press release by Sky Travel.

The life coach and psychologist created a formula to determine the ‘saddest’ day of the year, and landed on today, because of the bad weather, dark nights, post-Christmas debt and failed New Year’s resolutions. Despite originally being coined as a marketing tool to get people to book holidays, the term has moved into being more common language. Many argue Blue Monday does not exist and instead of booking a holiday because you’re supposed to be feeling sad, donate to charity instead or turn it on its head into something positive.

While booking a holiday may have resolved your pre-pandemic Blue Monday blues, throw in the continued restrictions of the pandemic and it might feel more like a Purple Monday! Mental health organisation Samaritans have turned the day on its head and are raising awareness of ‘Brew Monday – and the whole country seems to be on board.

Brew Monday

“Stay connected”, “don’t let things stew, get together for a brew’ and “share the warmth” are just some of the brilliant quotes being shared by mental health charity Samaritans this month, as they have been promoting Brew Monday. A day to turn what is usually a gloomy day at the best of times around and into something positive by encouraging people to get together over a warming virtual cuppa.

Samaritans have said: “Reach out to a friend, family member or colleague for a virtual cuppa and a chat. It doesn’t have to be a Monday or a cup of tea, just taking time to really listen to another person could help them work through what’s on their mind. Because now more than ever, sharing a cuppa is more than a drink – it’s about reaching out, checking in and staying connected. Have a Brew Monday, any Monday, or a day that’s good for you.”

Samaritans also shared a few ways people can connect virtually:

  • Group audio/video calling is available on Zoom, Skype, Microsoft Teams, WhatsApp (up to 4 people on a call) and Facebook messenger.
  • A phone call or conference call can work just as well for connecting with people, especially for those not comfortable on camera.
  • Use your virtual get-together to raise money for Samaritans, you’ll help give people having a tough time somewhere to turn when they need to talk.

Want to fundraise for Samaritans?

Stay connected, get everyone together for a virtual cuppa and raise money for Samaritans by visiting their website. You can also download their free Brew Monday digital kit to help you have a happy Brew Monday!

Right, we’re off to make a coffee… ☕️❤️

Want to share a virtual coffee with the team at South Coast Social? If you want to discuss all things social or if you just need someone to talk to, we’re here for all our clients, business partners and friends. Contact us today through our website or drop us a DM on social.

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